Cameron Abadi

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Bound to Muddle?
Or perhaps the EU can engage effectively in the Middle East
by Cameron Abadi
The Treaty of Lisbon was written, at least in part, under the assumption that incoherent institutions were the great scourge blocking the European Union on the international stage. A bit of tinkering—a Council president here, a foreign minister there—and Brussels’ influence would flow freely to all corners of the globe.
Category: European Union, Near and Middle East/North Africa, Europe
The Fog of Mistrust
Above all, the past bars the way to a new era of US-Iran relations
by Cameron Abadi
There are many reasons why the United States and Iran regard one another as enemies. The Iranians held the American embassy hostage; the Americans sided with Saddam Hussein during the Iran-Iraq War. Iran sponsors terrorism; America sponsors regime change. America is the Great Satan; Iran is in the Axis of Evil. And, last but not least, the two nations have simply grown accustomed to treating each other as enemies for most of the past 30 years.
Category: International Policy/Relations, Iran, United States of America, Near and Middle East/North Africa, North America
The Long Haul
Soft power and patience should dominate US policy in the Middle East
by Cameron Abadi
Presidential elections in the United States are not decided on foreign policy. So goes, at least, the conventional wisdom. The theory of the provincial and parochial American voter—more interested in “pocketbook issues” than world affairs—has a long standing history. But it reached its pithiest and snidest formulation in 1992 when candidate Bill Clinton’s campaign team chided George Bush Sr. with the slogan: “It’s the economy, stupid.”
Category: Security, Terrorism, North America, United States of America
The Long Haul
Soft power and patience should dominate US policy in the Middle East
by Cameron Abadi
Presidential elections in the United States are not decided on foreign policy. So goes, at least, the conventional wisdom. The theory of the provincial and parochial American voter—more interested in “pocketbook issues” than world affairs—has a long standing history. But it reached its pithiest and snidest formulation in 1992 when candidate Bill Clinton’s campaign team chided George Bush Sr. with the slogan: “It’s the economy, stupid.”
Category: Security, Terrorism, North America, United States of America, Near and Middle East/North Africa

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